How to Toast Squash Seeds of Any Kind {recipe}

Toasted Butternut Squash Seeds
“Not wasting” food is not a new concept to us. We grew up in a household much like everyone else’s household, in which we weren’t allowed to leave the table unless we ate everything on our plates, leftovers were re-purposed over and over until they were completely gone, and our moms sucked every last “perfectly good” bit of flavor out of pork and beef bones to makes stocks. If there were a way to make sure that the bones themselves were consumed in some normal way, we’re sure our parents would have been doing that, too.

So, it’s not a surprise that as we become our parents, we do the same, not wasting a single, edible thing. In another lifetime, in a lifestyle, we probably would have shamefully washed the pulpy, seedy mess from a gutted butternut squash down the drain on the garbage disposal side without blinking an eye. Today, though, it hurts our hearts to throw peels into the trash because our composting bin has not yet arrived, but we can at least feel good about roasting the seeds into a snack that’s not just “un-wasteful,” but actually healthy, too.

Toasted Butternut Squash Seeds

How to Toast Squash Seeds

A long time ago, we did this pumpkin seeds. Recently, it’s been butternut squash seeds. If there are other squash with significantly sized seeds, we’re sure this method would work.

Ingredients

for each ½ cup squash seeds:
1 teaspoon olive oil
½ teaspoon salt, or to taste

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

Remove seeds from squash, rinse and remove all squash pulp. (One squash yielded about ¼ cup of seeds.)

Rinse the seeds, pat dry. Toss with olive oil, sprinkle with salt, and spread in a single layer on a heavy baking sheet.

Roast for 15-20 minutes, or until you start hearing the seeds “pop.”

(You can also do this at a higher temperature and roast the seeds for a shorter period of time, but for some reason, we think that higher roasting temperatures might kill whatever health benefits the seeds have.)

by Sarah J. Gim on February 23, 2011 · 0 comments

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: